Call for Entries | En Foco 2017 Photography Fellowship

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En Foco is currently accepting submissions for its 2017 Photography Fellowship through February 6, 2017.

En Foco, the leading arts organization serving support to photographers of color, is accepting submissions for its 2017 Photography Fellowship, designed to support photographers of color who demonstrate the highest quality of work as determined by a photography panel of peers and industry professionals. Submission Deadline is Monday, February 6, 2017 at 11:59pm. Fellowships will be announced in mid-March. Contact E-mail: fellowship@enfoco.org.

The Photography Fellowship Program will award ten Fellowships of a $1,000 each; participate in the 2017 Fellowship Group Exhibition; feature the Fellows in En Foco’s Nueva Luz publication, in printed and online editions; and provide Professional Development and Networking Opportunities. En Foco is highly regarded for its leadership in the variety of ways it supports photographers of color and for its advocacy role in addressing the issues related to the lack of cultural equity and access.

Who Can Apply: (1) Photographers of Latino, African, Asian American heritage, and Native Peoples of the Americas and the Pacific; (2) Must be a resident of New York City or New York State for the past year at the time of submission and must show proof of residency; (3) Must be at least 18 years of age; (4) Collaborating photographers are eligible to apply, but only one photographer can submit the application; (5) Previous winners of En Foco’s New Works Fellowship Program prior to 2014 are eligible to apply; (6) Photography for consideration must represent work completed after 2014.

Who Cannot Apply: (1) Graduate or undergraduate students matriculated in a fine art and/or photography degree program at the time of application submission; (2) En Foco’s Board members and staff are ineligible to apply.

Panel Process: The Fellowships selected are based exclusively on the excellence and quality of the work submitted. All work will be reviewed by panelists selected from a pool of photography and photography-related professions, such as photographers, curators, critics, and collectors. Each year, new panelists are chosen to ensure a fresh perspective in the fellowship review process.  En Foco’s Board of Directors will review the panel recommendations to assure the integrity of the process and formally approve the Fellowship awardees.

Award Notification: The ten Fellowship Awardees will be notified via email. The Awardees will each receive $750 dollars with the balance of $250 to be remitted at the Fellowship Awardees’ participation in their exhibition.

Submission Requirements: (1) Create an account with Submittable.com; (2) Include a written description (no more than 400 words). Describe specific aspects of your work practices such as subject matter, context, content, location and personal relevance; (3) A one-page resume and 200-word biography; (4) A 200-word artist statement about your work; (5) Five images, follow the sizing guidelines; (6) Head shot (300 dpi, jpeg only). The application form does not have to be completed in a single session. The system will save your draft application. We suggest that you save often as you fill out the form, and that you save a copy of any narrative texts. 

Support for the En Foco Photography Fellowship program has been provided by an anonymous donor with additional support by the New York State Council on the Arts, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, and the National Endowment for the Arts. A special thank you to the Andrew Freedman Home.

 

En Foco Releases Newly Designed Nueva Luz vol. 20:1 Spotlighting the Bronx Women’s Photo Collective

NL 20-1_CoverImageBronx, NY | July 2016 – Nueva Luz vol. 20:1, the revitalized and redesigned photographic journal from En Foco is now available in print and online. As with past issues of Nueva Luz, the magazine has illustrated the provocative, the avant-garde and the perspicacious photographic prognostications and philosophies from photographers of color who probe the heart of humanity through their lens.   Continue reading “En Foco Releases Newly Designed Nueva Luz vol. 20:1 Spotlighting the Bronx Women’s Photo Collective”

Picturing Diversity: I Am Stereotype (part 2b)

Esteemed author and cultural critic Ilan Stavans, will be writing a series of ten essays specifically for our photographic journal, Nueva Luz and our blog. ‘I Am Stereotype’ is the first article in the ‘Picturing Diversity’ series, which will later become a book on photography. In discussing how the medium has changed, Stavans challenges assumptions on how society sees the world and how we view each other. It is a pleasure to be able to bring this exciting series to our readers. Continue reading “Picturing Diversity: I Am Stereotype (part 2b)”

Picturing Diversity: I Am Stereotype (part 2a)

Esteemed author and cultural critic Ilan Stavans, will be writing a series of ten essays specifically for our photographic journal, Nueva Luz and our blog. ‘I Am Stereotype’ is the second article in the ‘Picturing Diversity’ series, which will later become a book on photography. In discussing how the medium has changed, Stavans challenges assumptions on how society sees the world and how we view each other. It is a pleasure to be able to bring this exciting series to our readers. Continue reading “Picturing Diversity: I Am Stereotype (part 2a)”

Valdir Cruz: Guarapuava

We are proud to share this blog post written by Susan Bishopric about En Foco alumni, Valdir Cruz‘s upcoming exhibition and book GUARAPUAVA at Throckmorton Fine Art. Cruz has been part of the En Foco familia for many years. His work is part of our Permanent Collection which is accompanied with a book and traveling exhibition, titled En Foco/In Focus: Selected Works from the Permanent Collection. Cruz’s is also part of our Print Collectors Program that is available for purchase. He has also been featured twice in Nueva Luz (vol. 6 #2 and vol. 12 #3).  

Valdir Cruz, Paisagem com arvores e lago, 2002,  Pigment on paper, 30 x 38 inches.
© Valdir Cruz, Paisagem com arvores e lago, 2002, Pigment on paper, 30 x 38 inches.

Valdir Cruz is a Brazilian photographer, born in 1954 in Guarapuava, the Southern State of Paraná, Brazil.  While Cruz has lived in the United States for more than thirty years, his photography has largely focused on the people, architecture and landscape of his native Brazil and the rainforests of Latin America. In 1996, Cruz was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for Faces of the Rainforest, a project documenting the life of indigenous people in the Brazilian Rainforest. The Guggenheim Foundation further supported this project with a publication subvention award.

What distinguishes Valdir Cruz’s photography, is the docu-essay form of his projects which expertly tap his interest in anthropology and culture.  He has lived among the native cultures not just in Guarapuava but in many Latin American locations and through exposure to different peoples and places developed a strong documentarian eye easily discerned from the Guarapuava works on display Sept 18 – November 1 at Throckmorton Fine Art in New York.

© Valdir Cruz, Pinus Araucaria, 1992, Selenium Tones Gelatin Silver Print, 11 x 14 inches.

In his introduction to the GUARAPUAVA book that accompanies the Throckmorton exhibition, photography researcher and curator, Rubens Fernandes, Jr., says “For over thirty years, Valdir Cruz has produced regular records of Guarapuava. His images are not commonplace; many people consider that documentation of a town means looking at the urban space and photographing it through its public road and imposing buildings, but here, contrary to what one might think, it is seen as a space where different ethnicities that make up Brazil coexist – Europeans, native peoples, and Africans – whose boundaries are surrounded by exuberant waterfalls and breathtaking landscapes.  This rare initiative distinguishes this essay’s uniqueness, with an unconventional exercise in constructing memories.  Instead of a cartographic reading of streets and buildings, he chose to portray local people, local events such as cattle divers’ dislocations, and landscapes that still pulse in the imaginary created by his childhood memories.  This is a keen record of a local dweller in his own land.

“The characters portrayed are anonymous heroes who, together with landscapes and waterfalls, celebrate this visual references.  Actually, it is an inventory of emotions far removed from the power setting represented by the urban space and its buildings, similar to a family album gathering a kind of inventive story articulated through desire-rich and imaginative narrative.  Valdir Cruz is able to transform commonplace occurrences into extraordinary things by circumscribing photography as a power of personal, social, and cultural values, far from the current visual easiness.  At the Guarapuava show, this manifest desire to excel is remarkable, since, as well as synthesizing his life experience, he also extends the visibility of people and landscapes marginal to the system.”

Valdir Cruz, Tropeiro Chico, 1990, Pigment on paper, 30 x 30 inches
© Valdir Cruz, Tropeiro Chico, 1990, Pigment on paper, 30 x 30 inches.

“Guarapuava” is Throckmorton Fine Art’s sixth solo exhibition of works by the documentary-photographer, Valdir Cruz, and one that is the culmination of a thirty-year project.

Spencer Throckmorton says, “Cruz’s exquisite photographic essay on ‘Guarapuava,’ the photographer’s hometown, bears out Tolstoy’s observation that to be universal one only needs to talk about his own village. With unremitting devotion, Cruz has chronicled the lives and lifestyles of this ephemeral and evocative place. The images are the result of his close investigation of its people and landscapes.”

© Valdir Cruz, Hands, 2003, Pigment on paper, 30 x 30 inches

Among highlights – “Guarapuava” showcases a photograph entitled, “Hands” which beautifully represents the absolute wide range of black and gray tones—from delicate charcoal shades to pitch darkness—resulting in a striking composition. It is also a visual and cultural commentary of a solitary gesture that models human complexity.

For more information on the artist, please click here.

 

Exhibition Information:

Dates: September 18th – November 1st, 2014

Location:  Throckmorton Fine Art 
145 East 57th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10022
(212) 223-1059

Hours: Tuesday – Saturday 11 am to 5 pm

 

More About Valdir Cruz:
Cruz was mentored and studied with some of the photographic world’s greatest practitioners.  First at the Germain School, and then when he received aesthetic and technical know-how working with George Tice at New York’s New School for Social Research. His talent has won him over fifty solo exhibitions since the early 80s at venues including the National Arts Club in New York, the Houston Center for Photography and FotoFest International.  His work has been acquired by private collectors as well as museums in the United States and Brazil including The Museum of Modern Art in New York City, the New York Public Library, The Smithsonian Institution and the Brooklyn Museum as well as the Museu de Arte de Sao Paulo.

 

Picturing Diversity: The Democratic Eye (part 1b)

Esteemed author and cultural critic Ilan Stavans, will be writing a series of ten essays specifically for our photographic journal, Nueva Luz and our blog. ‘The Democratic Eye’ is the first article in the ‘Picturing Diversity’ series, which will later become a book on photography. In discussing how the medium has changed, Stavans challenges assumptions on how society sees the world and how we view each other. It is a pleasure to be able to bring this exciting series to our readers.

For Part 1-A of this article, please visit : Part 1-A:The Democratic Eye

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In Rita Rivera’s photograph of the legendary baseball pitcher Mariano Rivera, a formerly exotic face is now graceful, classy. There is a severity to Rivera’s expression, a resignation. He poses in front of the photographer, not to be subdued, to be imprisoned, but to showcase his demeanor. There is no arrogance, no threat. If this is fame, he says, I’m undisturbed. What matters isn’t how I look but what I do. The player’s stoicism is a lesson. He is neither arrogant nor condescending. He simply affirms himself though his representation.

Rita Rivera, Mariano Rivera, Closing Pitcher for The New York Yankees, Latinos in Major League Baseball series, 2002/2013. Selenium toned gelatin silver print, 14 x 11"
Rita Rivera, Mariano Rivera, Closing Pitcher for The New York Yankees, Latinos in Major League Baseball series, 2002/2013. Selenium toned gelatin silver print, 14 x 11″

The democratic eye approaches its theme with decorum only when its subject demands it. For the most part, that eye is restless, mendacious, critical, even condescending. It stops at nothing. Its basic tenant is the demystification of reality. Look at Bradford Robotham’s marvelous image, The Kiss. The couple in it makes a fool of themselves. Isn’t that what people do before the camera nowadays? Happiness is skin-deep: everyone smiles, everyone kisses. These characters could be descendants of Diane Arbus’ circus: while they aren’t freaks, they are unrefined, trashy. This is how we live life today, they say, without etiquette. One might argue, of course, that a summer day on the beach is just an outlet for folks to relax, be silly, to let their hair down. And that if we don’t take context or the artist’s intent into account, aren’t we doing what we’re accusing condescending photographers of doing? Robotham doesn’t look down at his subjects. His eye is that of an anthropologist: he is objective, clear-minded, leaving it to the viewer to judge.

The effect is numbing. It implies a fostering of relativity. Truth is spelled with a lower-case t. Clarity has opened the door to the nuance of minorities, to complex degrees of shade. Everything is deemed notable. And memorable, too. People used to create albums of their lives with a set number of images. Today that effort is done less curatorialy, and more haphazardly. A sheer accumulation of images becomes a shareable past, one to be paraded on by friends. It is a selective pass, fluid, malleable.  Plus, it is easy to manipulate that past. All it takes is manipulating the photographic content: the sunset might be presented in sharper tones, a person’s face less tragic, more upbeat. And, should the landscape be deemed inappropriate, it takes nothing to refurbish it. The world, as it is, only constitutes a draft.

Bradford Robotham, The Kiss, Coney Island series, 2008. Archival pigment print, 19 x24"
Bradford Robotham, The Kiss, Coney Island series, 2008. Archival pigment print, 19 x24″

What has all this democracy, this pluralism done to us? It has made us unruffled, relaxed, blasé to the point of ignorance. And it has brought down our defenses. The effect is a cheapening of experience. Timidity is seldom an issue anymore: to be on camera is to be real and to be left out of a photograph is to be ignored, to lack significance, to be as good as dead. Worse, pictures constantly stress the performative qualities of our social interaction, making us rude, aggressive, nervously flamboyant, uncontained.

Life is a party orchestrated so that photographs will be taken. It isn’t bad to be fake anymore, to become impostors, to exist in a permanent state of pretense. We are all actors. We are always being asked to be in shape, to display happiness, to joyful. Smile and hide your belly. To be depressed is to be non-photogenic.

In its egalitarianism, in its classlessness, photography makes us reflections of ourselves. It isn’t interested in eternity. Instead, it loves the normal, the average, the dull. We are all unique in our difference, it clamors.

Next Article, Picturing Diversity: I Am Stereotype (part 2-a).

Ilan Stavans, one of today’s preeminent essayists, cultural critics, and translators, is Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture and Five College-Fortieth Anniversary Professor at Amherst College. His books include Spanglish (2003), Love and Language (2007), and Gabriel García Márquez: The Early Years (2010), Return to Centro Histórico: A Mexican Jew Looks for His Roots (Rutgers, 2012), and the graphic novel El Iluminado (Basic, 2012, with Steve Sheinkin). He is the editor of The Oxford Book of Jewish Stories (1998), The Poetry of Pablo Neruda (2003), the 3-volume set of Isaac Bashevis Singer: Collected Stories (2004), Becoming Americans: Four Centuries of Immigrant Writing (2009), The Norton Anthology of Latino Literature (2010), and The FSG Books of 20th-Century Latin American Poetry (2011), and a guest writer for Nueva Luz, volume 10#1 (2004).

Rita Rivera is a NY based photographer, photo editor and awardee of En Foco’s first New Works program in 2001. Her recent book with writer Rafael Hermoso is Speak English! The Rise of Latinos in Baseball, Kent State University Press, 2013.

Bradford Robotham has been photographing the Coney Island area since 1998, and featured that work in an En Foco Touring Gallery exhibition in 2013. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, Robotham was an assistant to John Coplans for over eight years, and lives and works in NYC.

About the Image: David Gonzalez

David Gonzalez looks back 30 years, to the moment he saw these dancers in a loving embrace in the streets of the South Bronx.

© David Gonzalez, The Dancers 1979
© David Gonzalez, The Dancers 1979

The Dancers is probably my best-known image, yet it sat in my archives – unseen – for 30 years. I was working at En Foco after graduating from Yale, and had gone to a street fair in Mott Haven with Rafael Ramírez to put up a Street Gallery on August 10, 1979 (my 22nd birthday). While we were there, a salsa band started playing, and a couple started dancing. I shot two frames of them.

And then I forgot about the image.

Thirty years later, I started scanning my old negatives, when I came across the image. Mind you, I had printed other shots from that day, but not this one. Of the two frames, one had them where I could see both of the dancers. It ran with a cover story and slide show I did for the Times’ Metropolitan section in late August 2009. The reaction to it was strong and immediate.

To me, this image speaks of a lot of things, especially given what was happening in the Bronx at the time. Here we have a couple, dressed to the nines, dancing in the streets when the outside world saw the South Bronx as irredeemable. Yet there, embracing and dancing to the soundtrack of an unseen band, they remind us how our roots, our culture, nourishes our souls.

One more thing: always go back to your archives. Your older self will discover things your younger self knew enough to shoot, but not necessarily to print. — David Gonzalez, May 28th, 2014

En Foco offers an exclusive limited edition print of The Dancers through it’s Print Collectors Program, so be sure to collect yours soon while the opportunity lasts.

For more information on David Gonzalez and his work, please click here.