About the Image: Susana Raab

Susana Raab’s compelling photographs were recently published in Nueva LuzOne of our favorites, is a portrait of Jaime Quispe, a young man with a portrait of a woman tattooed on his chest. About the Image describes how this encounter with Quispe was the catalyst to Raab’s own personal awakening.

Jaime Quispe, Playa Agua Dulce, Lima, Peru, 2013, Cholita series, 2013.  Digital C-print, 20 x 24”
Jaime Quispe, Playa Agua Dulce, Lima, Peru, 2013, Cholita series, 2013. Digital C-print, 20 x 24”

I knew before he responded to my question what his answer would be.  Jaime Quispe stood out to me amidst the crowds in the working class Limeño beach of Playa Agua Dulce because of the portrait of the woman tattooed to his chest.  One of the underlying personal themes in Cholita is the nature of human attachments.  I confront my own fears and longing for attachment by visually exploring those of others.

Jaime Quispe had lost his beloved mother and immortalized her on his body. This symbolic fusion of selves reminded me of the ee cumming’s line, “i carry your heart, i carry it in my heart.” All my life, I have longed to know a maternal love that is supportive rather than destructive.  Through Jaime Quispe and the many other Peruvians who have shared fragments of their lives with me, I was finally able to step outside my own protective denial and recognize the losses I have sustained: the first steps towards reconciliation began on that beach with Jaime.    —Susana Raab, Feb 19, 2014

To see more of Raab’s Cholita series and other remarkable photographers in the current issue of Nueva Luz, click here for a free downloadable sampling.

For those of you in love with photography and culture that want to cut to the chase, please subscribe HERE.

Learn more about Susana Raab here, and at susanaraab.com

Print Program Highlight: Terry Boddie’s School Days

I wish to investigate and illustrate the relationship between two kinds of memory: the kind that is documented by mechanical recording devices, such as the camera, or preserved through historical materials such as maps, birth certificates, ledgers, and the kind of memory which resides in the recesses of the mind. — Terry Boddie, excerpt from artist statemet

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En Foco offers a beautiful limited edition print of Terry Boddie’s School Days – an archival pigment print, 16″ x 20″ (paper size 17″ x 22″) – edition of 10.

In Terry Boddie‘s series The Residue of Memory, his photography serves to freeze past moments that have been adjourned, while his mark making re-invents and triggers life, movement, and realization.

The two very different methods combined, compliment each other suggesting the push and pull between what is true and what is false, in addition to the balance of remembering and forgetting. Concerns of exile, migration, globalization, as well as memory’s role in holding onto cultural traditions, are prevalent throughout his series and serve as his motivation in continuing his work.

Having gone through the education system in the United States, it was no wonder why Boddie was inspired to create School Days. What was being taught in schools was counterfeit to the true basis of African culture. The two children with British-style uniform (upper right hand corner) symbolizes something other than happy gallops to school, but the neglect of culture and leaving it behind; the undesired sacrifice for an education. As the piece unravels, it becomes more about “knowledge” than anything else.

In creating this piece, Boddie started with the investigation of the African language and writing system. As he was also involved with much printmaking at the time, he became highly interested in composition and the incorporation of various artistic mediums;  photography, the use of pastels, with a printmaking foundation.

The grape leaf with face on the lower left was made with liquid photographic emulsion; a process of making ones own photo paper then adding color. Layering all of these components was a purposeful strategy, as it indicates the war between subjective and objective voices for the role of the narrator. Again, these are all choices made to emphasize the way education is disseminated to kids of African descent.

From here, all that was missing was that one element: color. The yellow oil stick used was intended to represent a sense of hope. Where this image served as a critic, the color stood to be uplifting as if to say “this is not a complete tragedy.” So when you look at Boddie’s piece, never forget that:

Knowledge is something that is both given to you AND something YOU discover. – Terry Boddie, interview on 7/16/13

En Foco offers a gorgeous limited edition print of School Days, 2000/2007so if you’re interested in owning this timeless piece, be sure to collect yours soon while the opportunity lasts

Currently, Boddie’s work is hanging in the Longwood Art Gallery at Hostos Community College along with many others from our Print Collectors Program until August 30th, 2013.

Conveniently, En Foco’s New Works #16 Photography Fellowship Awards Exhibition is also on view until August 30th, featuring the work of Yijun Pixy Liao, Mercedes Dorame, Rodrigo Valenzuela, Daniel Ballesteros, and Jared Soares. We hope you can take a trip there, if you haven’t done so already!

Terry Boddie will have a solo exhibition at Aljira Center for Contemporary Art from September 26 to December 21, 2013 and a group exhibition at Paul Robeson Gallery at Rutgers University in Newark, September 3 – December 24, 2013.

To see more of his work, please visit
www.enfoco.org/index.php/photographers/photographer/boddie_terry/
and www.terryboddie.com.

Visually Speaking: Women Image Makers

On Monday April 29th, 2013 the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture held a panel called, “Visually Speaking: Women Image Makers,” co-presented by En Foco. Led by Grace Aneiza Ali, Founder and Editorial Director at Of Note Magazine, the panel consisted of four influential women in today’s art world: Lauri Lyons, Dephine Fawundu, Lalyah Amatullah Barrayn, and En Foco’s Executive Director, Miriam Romais.

All four women are not only photographers and image-makers; they are editors, founders, educators, mentors, students, non-profit leaders and barrier breakers. Each of them have explored a variety of concepts relating to identity, race, class, nationalism both within and outside the US, human experience, spirituality and have traveled the world creating and inspiring others along the way.

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L to R: Grace Aneiza Ali, Lauri Lyons, Lalyah Amatullah Barrayn, Miriam Romais and Dephine Fawundu. Photo © Ray Llanos

The night began with a short introduction by Grace Aneiza Ali but quickly turned to each artist so that the audience was able to get to know them and the work they do.

Dephine Fawundu, who describes herself as a cultural anthropologist at heart, discussed her series, Nina’s Four Women: An Interpretation, which examines Nina Simone’s song, “Four Women.” In this series she creates different images of black women today, addressing a few questions: How are we as black women portrayed? What do these images we see daily mean to us? What context are we placed in? Who are these women? And what are their histories?

Delphine Fawundu talking about her piece, Aunt Sara. Photo © Dani Cattan
Delphine Fawundu talking about Aunt Sara from the Nina’s Four Women series. Photo © Dani Cattan

Through self-portraiture, she examines four different portrayals of women- Aunt Sara, Saffronia, Sweet Thing, and Peaches. Fawundu transforms herself as multiple representations of racially categorized women- all based on an outward identity that isn’t necessarily based in truth. The main goal of her series is to provoke the audience to look beyond the image, look beyond the media and search for the truth, the real histories and the real stories of these black women today.

Miriam Romais, the Executive Director of En Foco and the Editor of En Foco’s photographic journal, Nueva Luz, describes two different series. The first series, Paríba Sugar, is a documentation about the lives of workers in the sugar refineries in Northern Brazil. This series is not only meant to shed light on their day to day, but also on the fragility of human life in comparison to the massive machines they work with. She aims to bring visibility to them and appreciation of these worker’s stories, as they produce a world sought commodity. It is also about engaging in conversation the issues these workers face and provide some insight into a life that most in this country will never experience.

Her second series, Painted Voices, is, in comparison, very different then Paríba Sugar, as the physical human presence is absent – but the evidence of human life (ie, mural over a garage door) evoke a subtle sense of place, affirming that the murals are part of someone’s daily life, not art confined to museum walls.  Painted Voices is a documentation of murals in the mission district of San Francisco. These murals assert the voice of their painters, along with the community’s collective political and cultural significance as well as hope and suffering and emotions that evoke and make up life. They are a daily part of the community’s lives and while somewhat temporary (as they get defaced and tagged) these are living and breathing parts of that community.

Laylah Amatullah Barrayn’s series, Her Word As Witness: Women Writers of African Diaspora, which premiered at the Restoration Plaza Gallery in Bedford Stuyvesant and NYU, consists of portraits of women writers of all genres (journalists, novelists, songwriters). The women have been witnesses to life around them and acknowledgers of  people’s movement, thoughts and daily lives. It is an intergenerational series, created as Laylah states, “a love letter to these writers” for their work and inspiration they have instilled in Laylah personally, as well as to many followers in all of their fields.

Laylah Amatullah Barrayn discussing her work. Photo © Terrance Jennings
Laylah Amatullah Barrayn discussing her work. Photo © Terrence Jennings

Lauri Lyons discussed multiple series, including how she started out with a goal of creating images from around the world and here in the USA. She wants to investigate around the planet, document, be a part of it, and then bring her work back to share with others. For her series, Flag: An American Story (featured as an En Foco Touring Gallery exhibition in 2008), she traveled around the USA by train for five years, gaining an in-depth understanding of how people really felt about the American flag and its significance.

She would start a conversation with someone on the street, ask them to write down how they truly felt about the USA flag and then photograph each participate with the flag, in any way that that person felt comfortable with. This series was especially powerful as the book, Flag: An American Storycame out only one month after September 11th, a time of heighted USA nationalism and sensitivity. Several years later, she continued the series this time in Europe, which led to her second book, Flag International.

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Lauri Lyons explaining one of her images. Photo © Dani Cattan

After we got to know the panelists and their work, the audience was given some advice and insight into what they are working on – besides image making. Lauri Lyons shared information on her online publication, Nomads, an online travel magazine, featuring stories and images by world renowned artists and journalists. Miriam Romais shared information regarding En Foco’s photographic journal Nueva Luz, the New Works Photography Fellowship Awards Program, and how the En Foco programs become a stepping stone to help further a photographer’s path. LaToya Ruby Frazier’s work was displayed as an example, as via the New Works program En Foco became the first place to believe in, and exhibit her work. Since then she has exhibited internationally, and has a current show at the Brooklyn Museum.

Miriam Romais explaining En Foco's photographic journal, Nueva Luz. Photo © Dani Cattan
Miriam Romais explaining En Foco’s photographic journal, Nueva Luz. Photo © Dani Cattan

Lauri also had some great advice for photographers in general, “As you’re pursuing the creative side, don’t forget to study business (and not the art business) on the side – as a photographer, the reality is you are a self employed business person. Expand yourself. Put yourself out there to people who are outside of your comfort zone, because you’ll get new perspectives, and create a stronger foundation for yourself.”

The last question posed to the panelists was, “What does it mean to be passionately committed to the image?” The answers were ones of inspiration and heart.

While the panelists seem to build upon each others responses, they all stated a few key points.

Being committed to the image is about a preservation of culture and story telling for the future. It’s about communication at this point, building dialogues with people around the world and it’s about the human connection. Communicating that through the arts and media is empowering and inspiring, and the beauty of it is that it lives on even once you’ve passed. Being passionately committed to one’s image making means being the best at your craft, using it to empower your subjects and being committed to their stories. Images play a huge role in the way we perceive people. To leave documentation of images and words of people, a legacy that is a realistic version of that, is what it truly means to be committed.

All four of these women are not only inspirational in their words, but the work they create is a clear representation of their commitment to their communities, to this world and to the art of image making.

The Schomburg Center will be posting highlights from the event in the next coming weeks, so be sure to check it out on  their YouTube channel.

The Visually Speaking program is a conversation series highlighting the works of select photographers, whose images bear witness to myriad cultures, scenarios, and mindsets, moderated by Grace Aneiza Ali and curated by photographer Terrence Jennings. For future topics and dates, please visit nypl.org

Waste Managment Inside Out: Alejandro Durán’s “Washed Up”

© Alejandro Durán, Derrame, Washed Up series, 2010

“One Man’s trash is another mans treasure.” This idiom embodies Alejandro Durán’s current body of work. Durán has come a long way since his series ” Washed Up” debuted through En Foco’s New Works Photography Fellowship Awards program #15 this past year, and we are excited to see the project grow.

Washed Up questions the debris existing amongst an ephemeral landscape, with the shores of the Yucatán peninsula as his studio. His installations permeate the landscape by collecting and curating clutter that does not dissolve or transcend into its surroundings. In his artist statement, Durán explains that “Sian Ka’an is also a repository for the world’s trash, which is carried there by ocean currents from every corner of the globe.”

This articulate juxtaposition and color scheme emphasizes the harsh contrast between the “natural” and “artificial,” allowing one to question the cultural significance of today’s waste in our ever-growing consumer culture. These remnants of plastic waste retain their shape and identity and lodge themselves into a permanent place in a changing scape – but with much effort, Durán disposes of the debris after he’s done.

Durán is not the first to photograph waste, and will not be the last, but his magic realist approach stands on a ground of its own.

A sneak peak of Alejandro Duran’s solo show at the GALERÍA OCTAVIO PAZ. Image Courtesy of Alejandro Durán

His work is certainly gaining notoriety. It was recently featured in El Diario, The Daily News and on the New York Times Lens Blog.

For more about this series, you can also read our prior blog post by Michael Mazzeo here.

Alejandro is also exhibiting at the Bronx Biennial of Latin American Art at Bronx Art Space, and is having his first solo show at the The Mexican Cultural Institute of New York at the Mexican consulate in October. His exhibition will inaugurate the newly renovated Octavio Paz Gallery.

Make sure to check it out it, the show dates are: October 4 through the 29, 2012.

Click here for more images and Alejandro’s personal webpage.

An Amazing Summer Fiesta 2012!

En Foco kicked off the summer with its much touted Summer Fiesta at the HP Gallery at Calumet Photographic on June 20th.  There was an incredible turn out, which allowed us to meet a Challenge Grant from the Lily Auchincloss Foundation, who generously offered to match every dollar we raised up to $10,000, by June 30th.

We wouldn’t have been able to do so without all of you, so here’s a BIG THANK YOU to everyone who came out, had fun, and supported us for this wonderful event!

Here are some fun highlights from the night!

Bidding on our Silent Auction pieces:

Michael Palma admires George Malave’s print in the Silent Auction
Eagerly awaiting to see who won the bids!

Everyone enjoying the artwork, food, and company:

Mark Brown (PDN) and Brandon Remler (Fuji), great friends and supporters

Some of the many amazing artists who so generously donated their pieces of artwork to the Summer Fiesta 2012:

L-R: Frank Gimpaya, Anjali Bhargava, Lola Flash, Groana Melendez, Miriam Romais, Steve Cagan, Ruben Natal-San Miguel.

The New Works #15 awardees (and their families!):

New Works #15 awardees (l-r): Adam Amengual, Alejandro Durán, and Priya Kambli

Some of our raffled Door Prize winners!

Pierina Bustamante grins ear to ear after winning a $50 American Express Gift Card (yes, we really DO have great door prizes!)

Ron Kavanaugh wins brunch for four at our favorite and supportive restaurant, La Palapa

Some of our Silent Auction winners!

Sidney Baumgarten and Terry Paladini-Baumgarten
Len Walker (after the bidding war), and Jim Reed from Calumet.

Surprise! Susan Karabin, our fantastic Board Chair, offered to match any donation  up to $1,000 to help meet our Challenge Grant requirement. Thank you so much Susan for such an altruistic gift!

And finally, a little surprise for Miriam Romais, the Executive Director – celebrating her 20 years with En Foco, Inc!

Board Members Miraida Morales and Susan Karabin with Miriam Romais

A few gals of the En Foco team that help make the magic happen: Olga Omelchenko (Nueva Luz Design & Production), Hilary Thorsen (former Program Manager), Miriam Romais (Exec Director/Editor), Kiersten Lukason (bookkeeping), Dani Cattan (Program Associate)

The donations and support we received are a testament to our strong and steadily growing community at En Foco. Meeting the Challenge Grant is proof that we as an artistic community, are evolving and growing together.

With every dollar received, we are able to continue to promote cultural diversity in the field of photography, cover the cost of exhibitions, publish Nueva Luz, provide our artists with monetary compensation for their work, and provide free workshops for our community. So again, THANK YOU for your dedication and investment in En Foco!

The Summer Fiesta was truly a success and it wouldn’t have been possible without you, our dedicated community members. We look forward to such a successful and fun Fiesta next year!

For more photographs from the Summer Fiesta, please visit our flickr page.

Photos courtesy Ray Llanos and Chris Connelly.

Christine Nguyen

In support of this year’s New Works Photography Fellowship Award Exhibition and to share the work of this year’s photographers with the online community, En Foco partners with juror Michael Mazzeo to highlight their work in a series of blog posts. Exhibition catalog is available, and includes all the work in the exhibition.

Blog post 4 of 5.

Christine Nguyen creates otherworldly ecosystems of her own evolutionary design. In them, marine life extends to the heavens, matter transcends physical form, and organisms generate visible energy to shape a vast network of interconnectedness. Borrowing from scientific imagery, she re-invents intricate systems to build a framework for a new cosmology.

In a fusion of processes, Nguyen uses cyanotypes, photograms, chromogenic and digital prints–some from hand-painted negatives, others overgrown with salt crystals. Most of the work consists of combined prints, with the largest assemblage containing more than one hundred images and measuring twenty-one by fifty feet. Her imaginative environments do not represent life as we know it. Though favoring the blues and greens suggestive of earthly oceans, Nguyen’s phantasmagorical imagery places us clearly in an alternate reality. Envisioned from both molecular and empyrean vantage points, her amorphous entities and volatile synapses combine to form a plethora of possibilities.

At a time of increasing skepticism, and even denial, of science, Nguyen’s metaphysical imagery gives us reason to carefully consider the causes and effects of environmental change and ultimately, the fate of our world.

Though we have become increasingly desensitized by pervasive images of human suffering, Perry’s adoption of an antiquarian process imbues the work with romanticism and nostalgia, leaving the viewer unguarded and allowing space for unexpected emotional responses. By recontextualizing these images, she hopes to bring a renewed scrutiny to a horrific situation and inspire urgently needed change to a disadvantaged society.

–Michael Mazzeo, Guest Juror, New Works #15

© Christine Nguyen, Cosmic Sparks, 2012

Christine Nguyen is the recipient of En Foco’s New Works Photography Fellowship Awards, an annual program selecting three or more U.S. based photographers of Latino, African or Asian heritage, and Native Peoples of the Americas and Pacific, through a national call for entries. The New Works program helps artists to create or complete an in-depth photographic series exploring themes of their choice, and provides the infrastructure needed for national visibility and a professional exhibition of their new work in the New York area. More about her at her En Foco Photographers page and her website www.lephant.com

Christine’s work is on view as part of New Works #15, at Calumet Photographic in Manhattan, through June 23, 2012. Please join us Thursday, June 14, 6-8 pm for the opening reception and Saturday, June 16, 2-3:30 pm for the artist talk.

Michael Mazzeo is a gallerist, educator and photographer based in New York City. He serves on the faculties of the School of Visual Arts, the International Center of Photography, New Jersey City University, and has been a guest lecturer at other prestigious institutions. He has been a featured portfolio reviewer at Fotofest, Review Santa Fe, Photolucida, Critical Mass, FotoWeek DC, The Center of Photography at Woodstock, ICP, ASMP, SPE, powerHouse Books, and Atlanta Celebrates Photography. www.mazzeoprojects.com


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Adam Amengual: Homies series

In support of this year’s New Works Photography Fellowship Award Exhibition and to share the work of this year’s photographers with the online community, En Foco partners with juror Michael Mazzeo to highlight their work in a series of blog posts. To view all the work in the exhibition, preview the exhibition catalog (or better yet, come by and see the show!)

Blog post 3 of 5.

© Adam Amengual, Daniel Castillo, Homies series, 2011

Adam Amengual has always been fascinated by the lure of gangs, cults and other organizations of like-minded members––but he is also interested people’s potential for change. By working with an intervention organization called Homeboy Industries, he was given the opportunity to explore these topics and share his images.

© Adam Amengual, Cindy Hernandez, Homies series, 2011

Homies might seem to be a collection of mugshots were it not for the inclusion of hands, hats, and sunglasses, but these commercially influenced portraits would be better suited to the magazine page than the wanted poster. Photographed against a clean white background with studio lighting often seen in celebrity portraiture, Amengual’s subjects, dressed in casual attire, could very well be actors, musicians, athletes, or artists.

© Adam Amengual, Adrien Caceres, Homies series, 2011

Upon close inspection however, their finely detailed tattoos display gang symbolism, territorial claims, and respectful tributes to lost friends and family. They are imposing characters, equally tough-looking men and women with a similitude of confidence and attitude. Sitting close to the camera, and often gazing out of the frame, their poses and gestures suggest pride and heroism,  and in a way, they are deserving of that status. All former gang members, they have made the decision to change their lives through intervention and rehabilitation. They are surely role models for countless others from similar backgrounds dreaming of a better future.

–Michael Mazzeo, Guest Juror, New Works #15

© Adam Amengual, Carlos Nieto, Homies series, 2011. “I don’t knock the next man if they want to participate in that (the gang life)… its not for me anymore, it never was… it was never was… even the stuff I would do I would feel bad. I do know that a lot of people in gangs… all it is, is a bunch of guys coming from broken homes that are hurt, and they’re looking for a family, that’s what any gang is, that what I think it is.”
© Adam Amengual, Edward Mejia, Homies series, 2011
portrait by Adam Amengual
© Adam Amengual, Jerry Montaque, Homies series, 2011. “The average person in the streets… they would take a job if they were blessed with one… I think every gang member in America would… get money the right way… because ain’t nobody on this earth born with a dark heart… it’s the way they were brought up. They parents were on crack and living in the projects they never had no food in the refrigerator… you see your mama stealing out the store you going grow up and steal out the store. “
portrait by Adam Amengual
© Adam Amengual, Jessica Sandoval, Homies series, 2011. “Growing up… it’s pressure, wrong choices, bad decisions, teenage years, pressure, it can… put you in a situation… to do bad things… but eventually you learn.”

Adam Amengual is the recipient of En Foco’s New Works Photography Fellowship Awards, an annual program selecting three or more U.S. based photographers of Latino, African or Asian heritage, and Native Peoples of the Americas and Pacific, through a national call for entries. The New Works program helps artists to create or complete an in-depth photographic series exploring themes of their choice, and provides the infrastructure needed for national visibility and a professional exhibition of their new work in the New York area. More about him at his En Foco Photographers page and his website www.adamamengual.com

Adam’s work is on view as part of New Works #15, at Calumet Photographic in Manhattan, through June 23, 2012.

Michael Mazzeo is a gallerist, educator and photographer based in New York City. He serves on the faculties of the School of Visual Arts, the International Center of Photography, New Jersey City University, and has been a guest lecturer at other prestigious institutions. He has been a featured portfolio reviewer at Fotofest, Review Santa Fe, Photolucida, Critical Mass, FotoWeek DC, The Center of Photography at Woodstock, ICP, ASMP, SPE, powerHouse Books, and Atlanta Celebrates Photography. www.mazzeoprojects.com